Category Archives: primary sources

The origins of architecture according to the Bible

Although recent architectural scholarship does not mention it too often, early eighteenth-century authors regularly coupled the secular, Vitruvian story of architectural origins (see this earlier blogpost for an introduction) to a biblical version. This was entirely representative of the contemporary

The origins of architecture according to the Bible

Although recent architectural scholarship does not mention it too often, early eighteenth-century authors regularly coupled the secular, Vitruvian story of architectural origins (see this earlier blogpost for an introduction) to a biblical version. This was entirely representative of the contemporary

The columnar histories of Kepler and Caramuel

As we have seen in my post on Renaissance depictions of Vitruvian origin myths, since the fifteenth century trees and columns have formed an intriguing alliance in architectural theory. In the seventeenth century however, a new dimension was added: the

The columnar histories of Kepler and Caramuel

As we have seen in my post on Renaissance depictions of Vitruvian origin myths, since the fifteenth century trees and columns have formed an intriguing alliance in architectural theory. In the seventeenth century however, a new dimension was added: the

Ovid’s Metamorphoses and the myth of the Golden Age: a gallery

Whoever wants to know more about classical origin myths and their reception in early modern Europe, sooner or later ends up with Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Written around 8 AD, the poem in fifteen books was an all time hit: read throughout

Ovid’s Metamorphoses and the myth of the Golden Age: a gallery

Whoever wants to know more about classical origin myths and their reception in early modern Europe, sooner or later ends up with Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Written around 8 AD, the poem in fifteen books was an all time hit: read throughout

Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura: an Epicurean interpretation of origins

In two earlier posts (of November and December 2012) I discussed Vitruvian origin myths, and their Renaissance afterlife; but where did Vitruvius base his account on? According to Rowland and Howe’s critical edition of De Architectura, [1] we might have

Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura: an Epicurean interpretation of origins

In two earlier posts (of November and December 2012) I discussed Vitruvian origin myths, and their Renaissance afterlife; but where did Vitruvius base his account on? According to Rowland and Howe’s critical edition of De Architectura, [1] we might have

Origin myths in Renaissance Vitruvius editions: a gallery

In my blog post of 9 November 2012 I promised to introduce you to the afterlife of Vitruvius’s origin myths: in this post I will therefore take you on a guided tour of some 15th and 16th century drawings and

Origin myths in Renaissance Vitruvius editions: a gallery

In my blog post of 9 November 2012 I promised to introduce you to the afterlife of Vitruvius’s origin myths: in this post I will therefore take you on a guided tour of some 15th and 16th century drawings and

The origins of architecture according to Vitruvius

When conducting research related to architectural history, it is virtually impossible to avoid discussing the mother of all architectural treatises: Vitruvius’s De Architectura libri decem. In this classical text, dating from the time of the Roman Emperor Augustus,[1] we find the

The origins of architecture according to Vitruvius

When conducting research related to architectural history, it is virtually impossible to avoid discussing the mother of all architectural treatises: Vitruvius’s De Architectura libri decem. In this classical text, dating from the time of the Roman Emperor Augustus,[1] we find the

Charles Blanc, Grammaire des arts du dessin, 1867

Some years ago Louk Tilanus, my friend and collegue from the art history department at Leiden University, pulled out his copy of the Grammaire des arts du dessin by Charles Blanc, first published in 1867. He was surprised that I

Charles Blanc, Grammaire des arts du dessin, 1867

Some years ago Louk Tilanus, my friend and collegue from the art history department at Leiden University, pulled out his copy of the Grammaire des arts du dessin by Charles Blanc, first published in 1867. He was surprised that I