Posts Tagged: origin myth

The primitivist paintings of Piero di Cosimo: a gallery

One of the first articles I read in my study of the primitive hut was a piece by Erwin Panofsky,[1] one of ‘the big three’ in art history,[2] in the very first issue of the Journal of the Warburg Institute.

The primitivist paintings of Piero di Cosimo: a gallery

One of the first articles I read in my study of the primitive hut was a piece by Erwin Panofsky,[1] one of ‘the big three’ in art history,[2] in the very first issue of the Journal of the Warburg Institute.

Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura: an Epicurean interpretation of origins

In two earlier posts (of November and December 2012) I discussed Vitruvian origin myths, and their Renaissance afterlife; but where did Vitruvius base his account on? According to Rowland and Howe’s critical edition of De Architectura, [1] we might have

Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura: an Epicurean interpretation of origins

In two earlier posts (of November and December 2012) I discussed Vitruvian origin myths, and their Renaissance afterlife; but where did Vitruvius base his account on? According to Rowland and Howe’s critical edition of De Architectura, [1] we might have

Origin myths in Renaissance Vitruvius editions: a gallery

In my blog post of 9 November 2012 I promised to introduce you to the afterlife of Vitruvius’s origin myths: in this post I will therefore take you on a guided tour of some 15th and 16th century drawings and

Origin myths in Renaissance Vitruvius editions: a gallery

In my blog post of 9 November 2012 I promised to introduce you to the afterlife of Vitruvius’s origin myths: in this post I will therefore take you on a guided tour of some 15th and 16th century drawings and

The origins of architecture according to Vitruvius

When conducting research related to architectural history, it is virtually impossible to avoid discussing the mother of all architectural treatises: Vitruvius’s De Architectura libri decem. In this classical text, dating from the time of the Roman Emperor Augustus,[1] we find the

The origins of architecture according to Vitruvius

When conducting research related to architectural history, it is virtually impossible to avoid discussing the mother of all architectural treatises: Vitruvius’s De Architectura libri decem. In this classical text, dating from the time of the Roman Emperor Augustus,[1] we find the